A Totally Reto Mode makes a comeback

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Since the inception of ham radio until the early 2000s, the licensing of an individual to become a ham radio operator has required an examination in sending and receiving international Morse code, CW, or “continuous wave” (as opposed to spark transmissions, which were intermittent). The reason for this was that the on/off nature of Morse code was reliable, needing the minimum of technology to implement, and that frequency stability and selectivity of early radios did not facilitate voice transmission and reception. There are many quant videos of military training films for Morse code instruction. To put it simply (which I try to do, sometimes too simply), almost any individual — especially one with musical ability — can learn Morse code in about two weeks to the five words per minute level (WPM), and about six weeks to the 13 WPM level.

I am KD8VON.  I have struggled to learn Morse Code for a few years now.  Nice to see that the effort wasn’t wasted.

Recently I did a DIY project on my YouTube channel changing the standard “Hello World” blink script for Arduino to be just a little different for those amateur radio operators who know the Morse.

GMH 053 DIY a better Arduino blink sketch, Hello World, Ham style

Please visit my channel and Subscribe if you like this video or you are a Ham.

Via: Nuts & Volts Match 2017 Issue

 

 

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