JavaScript Build Tools and Automation Systems to Use — DZone Web Dev Zone

Image title

JavaScript has become a very popular tool for web developers all around the world today. You can build lots of projects such as web applications, mobile applications, and so much more. However, some tasks are very important in the development process, such as minification, unit testing, and web page refreshing. These tasks are not just…

It seems like the never-ending waterfall of JavaScript goodness.  Here are some tools to help in the “Process”  of programming.

  • Webpack
  • Grunt
  • Gulp
  • Browserify
  • Brunch.io
  • Yeoman

via JavaScript Build Tools and Automation Systems to Use — DZone Web Dev Zone

450 Free Online Programming & Computer Science Courses You Can Start in December

Six years ago, universities like MIT and Stanford first opened up free online courses to the public. Today, more than 700 schools around the world have created thousands of free online courses.

I’ve compiled this list of 430 such free online courses that you can start this month. For this, I leveraged Class Central’s database of over 8,000 courses. I’ve also included each course’s average rating.

This list has a little bit of everything.  College courses, instructor lead videos and professional.  It may take a little bit to weed out the good ones but, hey their free!

Via: Free Code Camp

5 common biases in big data

2017-12-07_14-52-08.png

Today, businesses are aware that a huge part of their decision-making is impacted by big data. The large availability of data does not warrant its relevancy and neither does the analysis of big data by data scientists and analysts, as human judgment can sometimes be flawed. Moreover, several factors may impact data, either positively or negatively. As a result, data may fluctuate from time to time. That is why it becomes crucial for data teams to know how to make the right inferences from big data. This is only possible when data analysts and scientists are aware of the existential biases and the solutions to them.

Special thanks to Nate DW for the link to this article.  The best one of the five of these is “Simpson’s Paradox”.  No, not the one where Homer smashed his little boy’s piggy bank and is wondering what he’s done. It’s when you notice a pattern in groups of data that favors a trend but, when you look at the cumulative patterns of the groups, the trend looks totally different.  This is an excellent read for those of you who are labeling yourselves “Data Scientist”.  I’m just a “Data Tinkerer”.

AAIAAQDGAAgAAQAAAAAAAAr7AAAAJDU0MmY1YzVkLWQ0NDgtNDRmMC05MzM1LTIxZTI4Njg3ZjE4Nw.jpg

Via: 5 common biases in big data

Science shows redheads have genetic superpowers | New York Post — Adventures and Musings of an Arch Druidess

redhead2.jpg

Dr. Augustin Galopin first recorded this fact in his 1886 book “Le Parfum de la Femme.” He reportedly detected that redheaded women emit a particularly distinct aroma — that of ambergris, an earthy and sensual scent. (Later, science proved that skin mantle — a thin, acidic film on our skin’s surface — is actually more acidic in redheads, causing perfume to more quickly evaporate when applied and potentially emitting a unique smell of its own.)

I know this to be true.  My wife is a redhead and she is a superwoma!!

via Science shows redheads have genetic superpowers | New York Post — Adventures and Musings of an Arch Druidess

Software development explained with Cars

The only thing more difficult than building software for a client is explaining how software is built to a client.  So we sat down to explain this incredibly complicated concept the only way we knew how – with pictures, and with cars:

Special thanks to Dan H. for pointing this most excellent infographic to me.  The folks at Toggl have outdone themselves.  I live in Michigan and I find using Cars as a metaphor works to explain complicated stuff.  I plan to make a post from this for my office.

software-development-methods-explained-with-cars-toggl-infographic-02.jpg

Via: https://toggl.com/developer-methods-infographic

 

SQL Server Machine Learning Services – Part 1: Python Basics

Image result for microsoft machine learning services images

With the release of SQL Server 2017, Microsoft changed the name of R Services to Machine Learning Services (MLS) and added support for Python, a widely implemented programming language known for its straightforward syntax and code readability. As with the R language, you can use Python to transform and analyze data within the context of a SQL Server database and then return the modified data to a calling application.

Here it is again “Python” being used for the programming language of data.  This series will introduce you to the renamed “R” now called “Machine Learning Services”.  MLS is a simple recipe, take the “R” stats engine, add a pinch of Python, add a cup of training.  This might be an interesting concept.  Guess I need to break out the Python in 30 Days book again.

 

Article: Relearning to Learn — InfoQ

For my 30 plus years in tech, I’ve been reading and listening to tech mostly wrong. After in depth investigation into learning strategies I’ve restructured my knowledge acquisition process. Find out how I’ve take control of my learning queue. How I now perform active reading while taking creative notes. And hear how to use reflection…

Like this author of this article Don Denoncourt I also have been doing the learning thing for over four decades.  Some of the concepts here I have adopted, active learning, going slower and taking notes.  I find the more notes I take, even if they are entered into Notepad the better I can remember those things.  I had notes everywhere, Evernote, LastPass, JIRA and little-handwritten notes.

I simplified things, I take “Dailies”.  Basically notes on what I’m doing and what I  learned.  I use a basic Notepad called Notepad2 which is a much better notepad.  I start out the day by copying yesterdays daily and deleting everything I either completed or no longer need to do.  I also do daydreaming on the Dailies to try and “Use the things I’ve learned”.

I use a Markdown syntax to help quick format the Daily so it is easy to read and update.  I use ASCIIDoc as my markdown of choice.  It only takes a little practice to use markdown.

Here is an example of today’s Daily

2017-12-07_12-34-55.png

The (=) is the main heading, (==) sub-headings, (.), (..) are bullet items, checkmarks indicate the item is done.  I copy everything into here, web links, snippets of text from the web for the things I’m doing.

Then I have a Chrome extension installed called ASCIIDoctor Preview live, which can read my daily file and display and print in a nicely formatted HTML page.

2017-12-07_12-39-26.png

I’m still learning about how to learn and even better, how to remember.

via Article: Relearning to Learn — InfoQ

Here is what Troy Hunt told Congress about data breaches.

2017-12-05_10-40-12.png

My task is to ensure that the folks at the hearing understand how prevalent breaches are, how broadly they’re distributed and the resultant impact on identity verification via knowledge-based authentication. I’ve had some great suggestions around tackling the root cause of data breaches and I’d love to have another opportunity in the future to talk about that, but it goes beyond the specific focus of this hearing. That said, who knows what I’ll be asked by congressmen and congresswomen on the day and they may well question what can be done to combat the alarming rise in these incidents. I’ve now got a lot of great references on hand to go to should that happen so once again, thank you!

My task is to ensure that the folks at the hearing understand how prevalent breaches are, how broadly they’re distributed and the resultant impact on identity verification via knowledge-based authentication. I’ve had some great suggestions around tackling the root cause of data breaches and I’d love to have another opportunity in the future to talk about that, but it goes beyond the specific focus of this hearing. That said, who knows what I’ll be asked by congressmen and congresswomen on the day and they may well question what can be done to combat the alarming rise in these incidents. I’ve now got a lot of great references on hand to go to should that happen so once again, thank you!

What is life like for people with secure information in the post-breach world?  Identity verification is no longer just a User ID and a password.  This transcript of the State of the Security is a worthwhile read.   Everyone has to up their game if they want to stay secure.

So many Linux’s for Windows, so little time. Microsoft Linux subsystem?

Get started with the Windows Subsystem for Linux

How many flavors of Unix can co-exist on a Windows system?  I have been using the CYGWin version of Linux on my Windows system, for quite a few years, to get my daily Linux fix.  When I installed GIT for version control I got another Linux in the form of the GIT BASH command.  I use MobaXterm to do 95% of my network connections and management and it has a Terminal environment which is yet another Linux command line.  Now comes the “Reborn Microsoft” with the Linux subsystem for Linux (WSL) where you can pick from a couple of the standard Linux distro’s, including Ubuntu to run in your Windows 10 system.

This Get started with the Windows Subsystem for Linux article from InfoWorld is a good introduction to the process.  Can any of these Linux on Windows environment be a replacement for an actual Linux platform? No, not really but they can help keep a mixed environment shop (Windows, Mac, Linux) be more productive, with no additional hardware or virtualization.

I’ll be taking WSL for a test drive and will publish a video on my YouTube channel in the near future.  GeekMustHave YouTube