HTTP request and Node, so many solutions, so little time.

Making HTTP requests is a core functionality for modern languages and one of the first things many developers learn when acclimating to new environments. When it comes to Node.js there are a fair amount of solutions to this problem both built into the … more

If you’re using Node to develop applications or servers you will need to handle HTTP requests.  The standard Node HTTP library is good but there are some options including promises, Super Agent and Ajax to name a few.  While it’s not rocket science this article comes from the experiences with NASA.

via HTTP Requests in Node.js — JSFeeds

API Gateways, the Rosetta Stone for data

Services in a microservices architecture share some common requirements regarding authentication and transportation when they need to be accessible by external clients. API Gateway s provide a shared layer to handle differences between service protocols and fulfills the requirements of specific clients like desktop browsers, mobile devices, and legacy systems. Click to see all chapters…

API Gateways are the middle man in the Application-Data relationship.  They serve as a community hall where folks go to meet and talk to one another.  This community hall has a universal translator like on Star Trek that makes data understood by all the people in the room.   Developers don’t worry about XML/JSON because the gateway understands them both.   DBA don’t worry about formatting the data because the gateway loves to format stuff.

Have you ever been fustrated with Sri, OK Google or Alexa?  Gateway quality varies from one vendor to another.  Write your own in Node may be an alternative, I don’t know.  Let’s talk.

via Building an API Gateway using Node.js — RisingStack Engineering

GraphQL an alternative method to develop REST API’s

Facebook may not be the favorite company of the open web community, for some good reasons. But when it comes to open source, most developers take advantage of their tools, libraries, and frameworks in one way or another. In particular, Javascript (Node.js) and PHP have advanced by leaps and bounds largely thanks to Facebook’s contributions. […]

GraphQL is an alternative method of developing API’s to can use traditional SQL databases and the “Exotic” (1)  noSQL databases.  Like everything new, there is a learning curve.  There is an excellent course on YouTube from Traversy Media that covers the basics to intermediate use of GraphQL

This library has support for JavaScript, PHP, React and many other environments.  It’s worth a look-see, you never know.

(1) In a meeting recently where the prospect said this.  Along with “noSQL is not a standard and is not considered secure.”

via GraphQL, the future of APIs — AltPlatform

30 Second API mock servers using JSON-Server and Node, Quick and Dirty.

In the UK we have a chef called Jamie Oliver and over the years he has created lots of TV episodes and also a book on how to make a complete family meal in 30 Minutes – The premise of this, is that time doesn’t have to be an excuse not to make healthy food […]

There are times when you need a mock server for a REST API that returns JSON results and you need it now!!  This article goes over the process to create one on your local system which could be transferred to a server.    You create a JSON file, simple text file,  with the data in it and JSON-Server writes a full API service around it.  It can do all the CRUD you want and support queries.

There are a few restrictions like having a key field requirement in each table with the identical name.  (IE: _id) .  Most of my work requires using the key that was already in the database (ie: benficiaryID, providerNumber, DiagCode).  Moving this to a server will require some technical talent that many companies don’t have.

I have used Mockable IO to provide mock API services that are server based and need to be accessed by developers outside of a corporate firewall.  The free version is enough for most projects to get started.

No matter which mock server you use be prepared to take a considerable amount of time to mock up the results sets you expect the API service to provide.

 

 

 

 

 

via 30 Second APIs… — Danny Dainton

Couchbase uses Swagger to tame the API Monster, so should you

Couchbase incorporated Swagger into our documentation a few months ago. “Swagger” refers to an ecosystem of tools and other resources for managing REST APIs. Core to Swagger is the Swagger specification. (The group behind Swagger donated the spec to … more

My business card states my title as “Technology Evangelist”. I learn technology, use it in solutions to the point where I can teach it to others then I preach it.  My audience is mostly people who probably think I’m a little crazy.  When it comes to REST and API’s the answer I recommend now is using Swagger and its toolset to design, manage and document your valuable API’s.  I scream every time I see Word/Excel/Email documents beings used to define API’s in large systems.   Using 20th-century tools to manage modern 21st-century processes like API’s doesn’t scale and helps contribute to some of the failures I have seen.

via Managing REST APIs with Swagger (video) — JSFeeds

Backlogger web app released to Github, it’s a Scrum thing.

2017-03-07 12.30.08.jpg

“Backlog” is one of those SCRUMmy terms used to identify features or functions that have been dreamed up or discussed for an application.   You collect these ideas into a list which is called the “Backlog”.  Then this list is reviewed (Sprint Review) and the ideas are refined (Groomed) and an estimate of effort (Story Points) is assigned to it.  Then folks get together and discuss which ones should be done in the next timeframe (Sprint).  To collect these ideas some companies use an issue tracking system or an off the shelf ticket system (Atlassian JIRA) and others just use a spreadsheet… gasp.

Sometimes all you need is a simple web application that all the participants can use to enter any ANY of the ideas that came up.  Even things like “The buttons should be colored blue.”  I needed a simple project to help me learn some technologies that are new to me.  Hence the “Backlogger” was born.  The whiteboard above shows the original concept.

Technologies used in Backlogger

  • JavaScript
  • NodeJS
  • Bootstrap
  • Mongo without the headache, neDB
  • jsGrid

Design Requirements

The design requirements were meant to be simple as possible to make this project something that could be done quickly.  They also needed to be flexible to allow for better learning.

  • Single Page Application
  • Open Source
  • No user logins, just a password, we are a big happy family
  • Self-contained application, no need for outside services or servers
  • Mongo database and Mongo queries
  • Allow for a maintainable list of people names who contributed ideas to the backlog
  • Allow for a maintainable list of functional areas to help groups the ideas
  • One time entry of an idea, no editing,
  • The editing of an idea will be done during the grooming
  • Filters that help find ideas quickly
  • Ability to backup and wipe the database (Mongo Documents)
  • Simple report that can be printed directly

GeekMustHave would like to thank Phoenix Learning Labs for the resources and funding to do this project.  GeekMustHave would also like to thank the MDHHS-DWIP team for the testing and feedback.

Open source, common components

What does it look like?

2017-04-02_13-19-46

Backlogger is an Open Source project available on Github.

https://github.com/GeekMustHave/Backlogger

Future

I’ve used “Backlogger” in one project so far but others who have seen it have expressed some interest in it.  That’s another reason why it’s Open Source.

Depending on the feedback I might do additional updates.  Maybe I need a “Backlogger” for the “Backlogger”?